Adventures in Organic Gardening

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We completed a few of the lingering projects we had to do in the garden. We put up a trellis for the zucchini, planted the peas and started the seeds for the broccoli and eggplant. I also started seeds for a few more tomato plants and butternut squash to go in where the lettuce and kale are now once we harvest those.

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Cattle fencing and some wooden stakes Marty cut from scrap wood = something for the zucchini to climb up on ao they don’t overtake the garden. We’ll do the same for the cucumbers once they start to get too big.

We had a major flood a couple weeks ago which was good and bad for the garden. It helped our kale, cabbages, and potatoes spring up quite a bit, but it ended up moving quite a bit of seeds I had planted a week earlier. Haha.

So now we have random cabbage, lettuce, and kale plants sprouting up in between rows and our carrots haven’t grown at all. I wonder if they got washed away with the flood.

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At least the flood gave Little Miss something to do while mama gardened.

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We’ve been able to harvest some good sized zucchini from the garden, but we haven’t gotten anything else yet. Our garlic, onions, potatoes, and tomatoes are growing steadily, and our peppers finally have grown some new leaves!

We’ve had quite a few cold days and a couple nights that dropped below 50 degrees, so they haven’t grown very much at all since transplanting them because they like very warm weather.

But all in all, with having no fencing around the garden and having not put any fertilizers, pesticides, or herbicides down, I’d say we’re doing pretty good with the few resources the earth has given us.

A few things I’ve learned since starting our garden:

1.) Cucumbers need a lot of water. I have had to water them every couple of days as opposed to all other crops which I have just let the rain take care of without any issues whatsoever.

2.) Weeding is way easier to do one day after a good rain. The damp dirt is way easier to hoe.

3.) You will have to weed at least once a week to keep it under control.

4.) Rabbits like tomato, cucumber, and bell pepper plants. Protect these babies early on so you don’t lose as many leaves as I did.

5.) Leaves will grow back after bunnies have feasted on them, so don’t sweat it too much.

6.) Cucumbers, carrots, and herbs have been the hardest thing to grow. Cucumbers sprout up super quick indoors, but need to take their time hardening up before they are transplanted. I think the herbs may need more sun/heat to sprout, and I have no idea about the carrots. They are a cool weather crop and we haven’t seen anything sprout since we planted those seeds.

What do you have growing in your garden?

<3,

Laura 

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Adventures in Organic Gardening 


OMG. I started planting two weeks ago and we’re finally almost done for a while! All I have left to do is plant carrots and peas and then broccoli rabe, eggplant, and butternut squash once the spring crops are harvested. And build trellises for the zucchini, cucumbers, and peas.

I can’t wait to see how much money we save on our grocery bill!

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Save on Your Water Bill With This Affordable Backyard Tool

We have always wanted space to live more sustainably. It’s so hard to do when you’re moving every few years from apartment to apartment. 

This little plot of land in the country is allowing us to fulfill that dream in a variety of ways. One of my favorite ways right now is collecting rain water. 


We got this rain barrel a few weeks ago and I’m loving it! After just two small rains, the 65 gallon barrel is already full. 

I’m excited to see how many gallons of water we save by using my new favorite yard tool. 

USES FOR RAIN WATER

-water gardens, house plants, trees, compost, etc. 

-drinking water for animals

-animal baths 

-beauty products (in place of distilled water in apple cider vinegar rinse for hair, body spray, etc.) 

-in place of tap water in homemade cleaning products

-dish washing 

-cleaning projects (mopping, steam cleaning, etc.) 

-outdoor showers 

-outdoor water play

You can also create a filtration system and use rain water for cooking if you wanted to! 

All you have to do to install your rain barrel is place it on top of two large cinder blocks so gravity will force the water out of the spouts (one spout is for a garden hose and the other is up high to fill buckets), and route a gutter directly into the rain barrel with a flexible gutter extension. 

We planted perennials around it to cover up the cinder blocks and put a nice planter of annuals on top just to help beautify it a bit.

Rue loves it too! 

What’s your favorite sustainable living project right now? 

Happy Thursday! 

<3,

Laura 

Immune Boosting Spice Blend

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I am so excited to announce that we have launched an Etsy Shop where we will sell a variety of handmade organic natural living products that are safe for the whole family!

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Meals 4 Health and Healing in Edible Nashville! 

 

Photo: Edible Nashville

I am beyond proud and absolutely humbled to have a few of my recipes featured in the latest edition of Edible Nashville, a local slow food publication.

 

Photo: Edible Nashville

Seeing the smiling faces of our extremely hard working volunteers and staff in print brings me such happiness.

 

Photo: Edible Nashville

Please read the article, try the recipes at home, and share on social media!

Meals 4 Health and Healing delivers organic immune boosting meals to cancer patients in Nashville and relies solely on individual donations so the more we spread our message, the more families we can serve!

Read the article here and PLEASE share!

<3,

Laura

Our First Winter in Nashville 

Last summer we decided to move to Nashville. One of the reasons we wanted to move south was the warmer climate. Before we moved, I talked to as many people as I could to find out just how cold it gets down here in the winter, but no one could really tell me what to expect. All I could find out was that it gets “cold”.

But cold by who’s standards? I needed to know from a fellow Yankee just how cold it got. Does it drop down to the thirties? Twenties? Below zero? How long does it stay cold? Should I pack my snow boots and scraper for the car or leave them in Chicago?

HERE’S WHAT I’VE GATHERED FROM OUR FIRST WINTER IN NASHVILLE:

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Baby Friendly Restaurants in Nashville

If you have family coming to town for the holidays that you would like to grab dinner and drinks with, take a look at the list of places we’ve been to in Nashville that are baby friendly. By that, I mean they have at least one of the following things: high chairs, changing tables, or kid friendly food. All of them have fast service and a bustling atmosphere that will drown out a fussy baby unless otherwise noted.

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